Sunnie Vision

The perspective of a Navajo sports journalist when she isn't butchering sheep.
My uncle turns the sheep head and explains the process of how to cook a sheep head during a community butcher in my hometown of Teec Nos Pos, Ariz.

My uncle turns the sheep head and explains the process of how to cook a sheep head during a community butcher in my hometown of Teec Nos Pos, Ariz.

I covered the 60th Miss Navajo Nation pageant and witness some fascinating young women run for the title. Here some are in the sheep butchering contest. It is a must for Miss Navajo to know how to do this.

I covered the 60th Miss Navajo Nation pageant and witness some fascinating young women run for the title. Here some are in the sheep butchering contest. It is a must for Miss Navajo to know how to do this.

Thank you and farewell to another Navajo Code Talker

Navajo Code Talkers are timeless heroes.

They are the men young Navajo soldiers wish to be and the heroes we all look up to.

This week, another Navajo Code Talker was taken from us. Samuel Tso, 89, of Lukachukai, Ariz., died this Wednesday.

Reports say that Tso wasn’t one of the original 29 Navajo Code Talkers but that doesn’t make him any less important.

I, myself could never muster up the guts to volunteer to help fight for the country that never even recognized my people, the Navajo people, yet these 29 and dozens more did just that.

The Navajo Code Talker helped win World War II using the Navajo language as code the Japanese failed to break. 

Our Code Talkers to this day are still the silent heroes when it comes to the outside world, but here on the Navajo reservation, they are our highest pride and joys.

In my still young time as a journalists I am honored to say that I was given the opportunity to sit down with such a brave Code Talker like Tso.

They are humble, graceful, wise and ever-so inspiring.

As a journalists and a Navajo women I am forever thankful for men like Tso and the rest of the Navajo Code Talkers. 

Ahe’hee, thank you Samuel.

-S.C.